Culture Military

Anniversary of Pearl Harbor

I just sat there. Feet dangling like a school kid off the built-up bank. Westward, across the Harbor, was the bright white memorial. I planned my flight through Hawaii specifically for this moment. I had memorized names. Read, reread, and read yet again reports from that day. I sure as shit wasn’t making my first trip to Hawaii about sun and surf; no time for mental crutches.

This day would — decades before my birth — end up framing very many years of my adult life… and the world I have chosen to navigate and engage. I sat there alone — repeating and remembering — and waited for hours for the sun to drop.

As it finally did, I said my prayers; sang my song.

Then I picked my ass up, shouldered my ruck, and hauled it to the nearest bus stop. My layover ended soon.

Ask just about Japanese person what started the War in the Pacific, and you’ve got a solid 50/50 shot of getting a palms up. Ask the 50% who know the answer, and you’d be hard pressed to find a single person under 80 who could tell you *when* it started.

Ask those same Nihonjin when John Lennon was shot… and I’ve literally never met an adult who could not answer with absolute correctness. Belies the priority of knowledge; what should be known. Remembered. Not forgotten.

We all know; the Ones Who’ve Served. We should *all* know. Every god of every pantheon, and every child born on the Pacific Rim should know and remember this day.

No other single catalyst in the history of Earth has shown such an absolutely insane spectrum of reaction, development, and execution. No other moment in the history of the U.S. shows — beyond the shadow of any doubt — what this Nation can do when we are not knit-picking superfluous bullshit, are standing together, and *engaging* our obstacles [instead of bitching about them, and each other].

Americans died. On station. At their fucking posts. Serving a country whose unknown enemy was already *inside* the gates.

From that point, no one of any real relevance had any doubt about how the Nation would proceed. And it fucking proceeded… punctuating that long, bloody sentence with a fire the world had never known.

Never, ever, EVER forget this day. (In a long line of other dark days, to be sure. Welcome to Earth.) And never forget that the Americans who died on this day were left behind by shipmates, swim buddies, battle buddies, and wingmen who skipped absolutely zero fucking beats in the commencement of hand delivering retribution. (My grandfather among them.)

Right now, we remember the fallen. Sing their song. We can do the future tomorrow.

Never forget.

Fucking ever.

“Theo Dyssean” is an internationally unknown expert in asking questions, finding answers, not getting caught, and not getting killed [and/or eaten by bears]. He enjoys moonlit runs down dark alleyways, and romantic evenings working through an interpreter who speaks less of the target language than he does. His hobbies include being in the wrong place at the wrong time, knowing where the exits are, being the fastest runner in the room, borrowing bikes, and sleeping in HVAC ducts. His religious and political views tend to orbit dominantly around Bobby Finstock’s Three Rules.

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Miche
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Miche

This. The remembering. The honoring. The reframing of the superficial fun and seemingly heavy day-to-day burdens with the greater context of where we came from. Contented sigh. <3

Mic-Mac
Member
Mic-Mac

What a powerful remembrance! Thank you THEO DYSSEAN.

clluelo
Member
clluelo

The most down to earth and true tribute I have heard ! Well done Theo

texj3
Member
texj3

Powerful.

georgehand
Member

Off the beaten path and reckless. My sincere compliments. I recall once in a public building passing a poster of Dwight D. Eisenhauer (German spelling) and remarking to the person I was with: “That’s a fantastic image of him.” She replied: “Who is that?” I looked at her surprised that she didn’t know who it was as she remarked: “Well, he was before my time,” to which I finished with: “Hell, he was before my time too.”

geo respectfully sends

Miche
Member
Miche

Hahaha. I drove past a billboard once with images of William Shakespeare and Teddy Roosevelt, both of which were recognizable. The only caption (beside the company’s logo) was “A Most Excellent Adventure.” I puzzled over that a good long while, wondering what they had to do with each other and adventure. I about decided that I just didn’t know enough about Shakespeare’s plays and Roosevelt’s hunting travels when it finally dawned on me it was a pop culture reference way back from my teens.

georgehand
Member

that one about got by me too… Bill and Ted’s.

susanh
Member
susanh

Wonderful article, Ody; thank you. And thank you to your grandfather.

Susan B
Member

Like. He did Susan H. It was a powerful tribute from a powerful emotion. I think that might explain some of Ody’s deep years-long knowledge of the Japanese and their culture. And we have shared the benefit of that concentration. I miss his stories about being over there. Perhaps he will give us more on the Freq. Hope so. And maybe some Haiku along the way.

susanh
Member
susanh

Hi Susan B. Sorry, I didn’t get a notification of your reply. Yes, it would be good to get more of Ody’s stories from Japan.

Susan B
Member

That’s okay. I’m getting used to not being able to “like” under someone’s comment or see any responses at all from other people. I just keep going back to see if there are comments so I don’t appear to be rude or thoughtless. It’s a real “pain”. Oh well….

susanh
Member
susanh

I didn’t get a notification of this reply either, Susan. I saw it because I had gone into my WordPress account and saw that there were notifications there. I sometimes can’t “Like” someone’s comment because there is no option to “Like” or it just says “Loading” by the “Like” option. I’m sure these are just wrinkles that the guys will be able to iron out as time goes on.

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